Denise Rable M.D., F.A.C.S.

10900 Hefner Pointe Dr
Suite 505
Oklahoma City, OK 73120

8 am - 5 pm Monday -Friday

Office: (405) 552-0400
Fax: (405) 752-4251

BRCA Genetic Testing

Dr. Rable is now administering BRCA Genetic Testing (BRACAnalysis® test) in her Oklahoma City, office. This test assesses a woman's risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer based on detection of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This test has become the standard of care in identification of individuals with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and may be reimbursed by insurance when medically indicated. DNA from a saliva sample is needed for testing. The sample is sent to a laboratory for analysis. It usually takes a few weeks to get the test results. Please call Dr. Rable's office or visit the myriadtests.com website to learn more about inherited breast and ovarian cancer.

Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing


BRCA1
and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumor suppressor proteins. These proteins help repair damaged DNA and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of the cell’s genetic material. When either of these genes is mutated, or altered, such that its protein product is not made or does not function correctly, DNA damage may not be repaired properly. As a result, cells are more likely to develop additional genetic alterations that can lead to cancer.

Specific inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of female breast and ovarian cancers, and they have been associated with increased risks of several additional types of cancer. Together, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for about 20 to 25 percent of hereditary breast cancers and about 5 to 10 percent of all breast cancers. In addition, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for around 15 percent of ovarian cancers overall. Breast cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations tend to develop at younger ages than sporadic breast cancers.

A harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation can be inherited from a person’s mother or father. Each child of a parent who carries a mutation in one of these genes has a 50 percent chance of inheriting the mutation. The effects of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are seen even when a person’s second copy of the gene is normal. A woman’s lifetime risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer is greatly increased if she inherits a harmful mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2.

Source: National Cancer Institute, BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing